JMIR Dermatology

JMIR Dermatology is the official journal of the International Society of Digital Health in Dermatology (ISDHD), formerly the International Society of Teledermatology (ISTD). 

Editor-in-Chief:

Robert Dellavalle, MD, PhD, MSPH, Professor and Head, Department of Dermatology, University of Minnesota Medical School


As an open-access journal, we are read by clinicians and patients alike and focus on applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies in dermatology. We publish original research, research letters, case reports, viewpoints, short articles, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged. JMIR Dermatology is the official journal of the International Society of Digital Health in Dermatology (ISDHD), formerly the International Society of Teledermatology (ISTD). 

JMIR Dermatology is indexed in PubMedPubMed Central (PMC)Sherpa Romeo, ScopusDOAJ, and CABI.

Recent Articles

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Theme Issue (2024): Diversity in Dermatology

This study underscores the persistent underrepresentation of women in academic dermatology leadership positions by examining the gender composition of editorial boards across top dermatology journals, emphasizing the urgent need for proactive strategies to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion.

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Theme Issue (2023): AI and ChatGPT in Dermatology

Dermatologic patient education materials (PEMs) are often written above the national average seventh- to eighth-grade reading level. ChatGPT-3.5, GPT-4, DermGPT, and DocsGPT are large language models (LLMs) that are responsive to user prompts. Our project assesses their use in generating dermatologic PEMs at specified reading levels.

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Case Report

Lichen planus pigmentosus (LPP) is a condition characterized by persistent and asymptomatic brownish-black–to-blue or purple-gray pigmentation, predominantly in the face and sun-exposed areas, commonly in dark-skinned individuals. Several clinical variants of LPP have been reported. However, the ichthyosiform type of LPP has not been reported. We present a 19-year-old male patient who presented with a 7-year history of asymptomatic grayish macules; patches with fine scales on the face, trunk, and upper extremities; and grayish plaques with thick “ichthyosiform” scales on the lower extremities. The diagnosis of LPP was proven by histopathological findings on both the macular and ichthyosiform plaques. Cluster differentiation (CD) 68 stain highlights the same density of pigment-laden macrophages in both the gray macule and the ichthyosiform plaque. The cause of LPP is unknown. Transcription factor anomalies may play a role in increased keratinization of lichen planus lesions. It can be assumed that the mechanism of the altered distribution of keratinization may occur on the ichthyosiform lesions in this patient. The terminology “ichthyosiform lichen planus pigmentosus” is hereby proposed to be added to the clinical variants of LPP.

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World Wide Web and Social Media in Dermatology

The wide availability of web-based sources, including social media (SM), has supported rapid, widespread dissemination of health information. This dissemination can be an asset during public health emergencies; however, it can also present challenges when the information is inaccurate or ill-informed. Of interest, many SM sources discuss cancer, specifically cutaneous melanoma and keratinocyte cancers (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma).

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Case Report

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare primary neuroendocrine skin tumor that presents as a flesh-colored or bluish-red nodule on the face, neck, or head. Long-term ultraviolet radiation exposure and Merkel cell polyomavirus are associated with MCC pathogenesis. We present a case of MCC on the right cheek in a male patient aged 87 years. Our primary goal in presenting the case is to bring MCC, which is a diagnostic challenge, to the notice of dermatologists and oncologists, as early detection and prompt treatment are important. The patient had a significant past medical history, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, stage 3 chronic kidney disease, benign prostatic hyperplasia, chronic hyponatremia, acute pancreatitis, essential thrombocytosis on hydroxyurea, and ischemic heart disease. The patient presented with a mildly swollen right upper lip showing a poorly defined, relatively homogeneous subcutaneous lesion with a history of persistence for 1.5 months. The clinical examination revealed a 5 × 3–cm nodular lesion on the right side of the cheek with swelling of the right upper lip. Immunohistochemistry markers and histopathological features confirmed the diagnosis of MCC. The patient was referred to the oncology department for further management. MCC of the skin is an aggressive lesion with a high risk of metastasis and recurrence, which is more common in immunocompromised people. Prompt management and treatment of MCC is essential because if left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body and can also metastasize to lymph nodes and other organs. The patient is 87 years old and has a significant past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease stage 3, benign prostatic hyperplasia, chronic hyponatremia, acute pancreatitis, essential thrombocytosis on hydroxyurea, and ischemic heart disease. Currently, the patient presented with a mildly swollen right upper lip showing a poorly defined, relatively homogenous subcutaneous lesion with a history of persistence for 1.5 months. The clinical examination revealed a 5x3 cm nodular lesion on the right side of the cheek with swelling of the right upper lip. Immunohistochemistry markers results and histopathological features confirmed the diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma. The patient was referred to the oncology department for further management. Merkel cell carcinoma of the skin is an aggressive lesion with a high risk of metastasis and recurrence, which is more common in immunocompromised people. Prompt management and treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma is essential because if left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body and can also metastasize to lymph nodes and other organs.

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World Wide Web and Social Media in Dermatology

Social media has established its place in our daily lives, especially with the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic. It has become the leading source of information for dermatological literacy on various topics, ranging from skin diseases to everyday skincare and cosmetic purposes in the present digital era. Accumulated evidence indicates that accurate medical content constitutes only a tiny fraction of the exponentially growing dermatological information on digital platforms, highlighting an unmet patient need for access to evidence-based information on social media. However, there have been no recent local publications from Turkey analyzing and assessing the key elements in raising dermatological literacy and awareness in digital communication for patients. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first collaborative work between health care professionals and a social media specialist in the medical literature. Furthermore, it represents the first author-initiated implementation science attempt focusing on the use of social media in addressing dermatological problems, with the primary end point of increasing health literacy and patient benefits. The multidisciplinary expert panel was formed by 4 dermatologists with academic credentials and significant influence in public health and among patients on digital platforms. A social media specialist, who serves as a guest lecturer on “How social media works” at Istanbul Technical University, Turkey, was invited to the panel as an expert on digital communication. The panel members had a kickoff meeting to establish the context for the discussion points. The context of the advisory board meeting was outlined under 5 headlines. Two weeks later, the panel members presented their social media account statistics, defined the main characteristics of dermatology patients on social media, and discussed their experiences with patients on digital platforms. These discussions were organized under the predefined headlines and in line with the current literature. We aimed to collect expert opinions on identifying the main characteristics of individuals interested in dermatological topics and to provide recommendations to help dermatologists increase evidence-based dermatological content on social media. Additionally, experts discussed paradigms for dermatological outreach and the role of dermatologists in reducing misleading information on digital platforms in Turkey. The main concluding remark of this study is that dermatologists should enhance their social media presence to increase evidence-based knowledge by applying the principles of patient-physician communication on digital platforms while maintaining a professional stance. To achieve this goal, dermatologists should share targeted scientific content after increasing their knowledge about the operational rules of digital channels. This includes correctly identifying the needs of those seeking information on social media and preparing a sustainable social media communication plan. This viewpoint reflects Turkish dermatologists’ experiences with individuals searching for dermatological information on local digital platforms; therefore, the applicability of recommendations may be limited and should be carefully considered.

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Reviews in Dermatology

The skin is an important organ of the human body and has moisturizing and barrier functions. Factors such as sunlight and lifestyle significantly affect these skin functions, with sunlight being extremely damaging. The effects of lifestyle habits such as smoking, diet, and sleep have been studied extensively. It has been found that smoking increases the risk of wrinkles, while excessive fat and sugar intake leads to skin aging. Lack of sleep and stress are also dangerous for the skin’s barrier function. In recent years, the impact of exercise habits on skin function has been a focus of study. Regular exercise is associated with increased blood flow to the skin, elevated skin temperature, and improved skin moisture. Furthermore, it has been shown to improve skin structure and rejuvenate its appearance, possibly through promoting mitochondrial biosynthesis and affecting hormone secretion. Further research is needed to understand the effects of different amounts and content of exercise on the skin.

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Theme Issue (2023): AI and ChatGPT in Dermatology

The large language models GPT-4 Vision and Large Language and Vision Assistant are capable of understanding and accurately differentiating between benign lesions and melanoma, indicating potential incorporation into dermatologic care, medical research, and education.

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