JMIR Dermatology

All topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. JMIR Dermatology is the official journal of the International Society of Teledermatology.

Editor-in-Chief:

Robert Dellavalle MD, PhD, MSPH, Professor, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, and Chief of Dermatology - Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center


JMIR Dermatology (JDerm) is a Scopus, DOAJ, and CABI indexed, peer-reviewed journal that focuses on all topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. While JDerm has strength in digital health and innovation in Dermatology, it is also a general dermatology journal and we welcome submissions from any part of the discipline.

As an open-access journal, we are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, research letters and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged, ready for submission in PubMed Central. Please note, JDerm is not currently included in PubMed Central (although this is expected in late 2022 or early 2023).

For a limited time period, there are no fees to publish in this journal. Become an author of this growing journal and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Dermatology Health Services Research

Certain protein kinase inhibitors have been reported to cause photosensitivity. Avapritinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that was approved in January 2020. The aim of this analysis was to determine if a statistically significant signal exists between Avapritinib and photosensitivity in the real-world population. A disproportionality analysis was conducted using the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) from January 1, 2020, to December 31, 2021. A literature review was also performed to identify case reports of Avapritinib-induced photosensitivity. A total of 13 adverse event reports with Avapritinib as the drug and photosensitivity as the reaction were identified in FAERS. Avapritinib was the suspect drug in all 13 reports, and in 12 of the 13 reports, Avapritinib was the only drug listed. Disproportionality analysis found a proportional reporting ratio of 11.0, χ21=107, reporting odds ratio of 11.0, and a lower limit of the 95% CI of the information component of 2.1. The literature review found 1 case report of Avapritinib-induced photosensitivity in a patient who had been taking Avapritinib 300 mg daily for 5 months. A statistically significant signal was found between Avapritinib use and photosensitivity. Clinicians should continue to balance the benefits and risks when prescribing Avapritinib to patients.

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Reviews in Dermatology

Emoticons and emojis have become staple additions to modern-day communication. These graphical icons are now embedded in daily society through the various forms of popular social media and through users’ personal electronic conversations. With ever-increasing use and inclusivity, exploration of the possible health care and dermatology applications of these tools is imperative.

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Teledermatology

In emerging market countries in sub-Saharan Africa, access to specialty services such as dermatology is limited. Teledermatology is an innovative solution to address this issue; however, many initiatives have been tried without sustained success. Recently, WhatsApp has been used as a store-and-forward telemedicine communication platform for consultation and education in Botswana.

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Teledermatology

Store-and-forward (SAF) teledermatology uses electronically stored information, including patient photographs and demographic information, for clinical decision-making asynchronous to the patient encounter. The integration of SAF teledermatology into clinical practice has been increasing in recent years, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite this growth, data regarding the outcomes of SAF teledermatology are limited. A key distinction among current literature involves comparing the quality and utility of images obtained by patients and trained clinicians, as these metrics may vary by the clinical expertise of the photographer.

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Teledermatology

Current clinician-led melanoma surveillance models require frequent routinely scheduled clinic visits, with associated travel, cost, and time burden for patients. Patient-led surveillance is a new model of follow-up care that could reduce health care use such as clinic visits and medical procedures and their associated costs, increase access to care, and promote early diagnosis of a subsequent new melanoma after treatment of a primary melanoma. Understanding patient experiences may allow improvements in implementation.

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Digital Photography and Imaging in Dermatology

Digital 3D total-body photography of the skin surface is an emerging imaging modality that can facilitate the identification of new and changing nevi.

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