JMIR Dermatology

All topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. JMIR Dermatology is the official journal of the International Society of Teledermatology.

Editor-in-Chief:

Robert Dellavalle MD, PhD, MSPH, Professor, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, and Chief of Dermatology - Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center


JMIR Dermatology (JDerm) is a Scopus, DOAJ, and CABI indexed, peer-reviewed journal that focuses on all topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. While JDerm has strength in digital health and innovation in Dermatology, it is also a general dermatology journal and we welcome submissions from any part of the discipline.

As an open-access journal, we are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, research letters and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

For a limited period of time, there are no fees to publish in this journal. Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged, ready for submission in PubMed Central. Although, please note, that JDerm is not currently included in PubMed Central (although this is expected in late 2022 or early 2023).

Become an author of this growing journal and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Reviews in Dermatology

Deidentifying facial images is critical for protecting patient anonymity in the era of increasing tools for automatic image analysis in dermatology.

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Reviews in Dermatology

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the use of pediatric teledermatology, with centers showing increased uptake of teledermatology. Pediatric patients possess unique characteristics that pose different challenges with teledermatology compared to adults, in turn affecting the feasibility and uptake of pediatric teledermatology in the community.

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E-Dermatology - General Articles

Skin conditions can detract from people’s quality of life, much like conditions such as cancer, chronic pain, and depression. Visible skin conditions can lead to risk of stigmatization. It is acknowledged that there is a lack of available psychosocial support for people living with chronic skin conditions. One way in which individuals with long-term conditions are self-managing and providing peer support is through blogging and exchanging information on the web. To date, no research has specifically investigated how individuals with skin conditions experience the use blogging for self-management.

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Patient Education for Skin Conditions

Information is an unmet need among cancer survivors. There is a paucity of population-based data examining the health information–seeking behaviors and attitudes of skin cancer survivors.

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Social Media in Dermatology

Due to the increased use of artificial turf, turf burn has become a common sports injury. Turf burn is caused by exposed skin sliding on artificial turf. Health complications, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks, sepsis, and pneumonia, have been linked to untreated turf burns, and many athletes have been turning to social media for advice and companionship regarding their sports injuries.

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Social Media in Dermatology

Crowdfunding for medical costs is becoming increasingly popular. Few previous studies have described the fundraising characteristics and qualities associated with success.

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Reviews in Dermatology

Delusional infestation, also known as Ekbom syndrome, is a rare delusional disorder characterized by the fixed belief that one is infested with parasites, worms, insects, or other organisms. Although delusional infestation is a psychiatric condition, patients often consult dermatologists with skin findings, and it is currently unclear what treatments are recommended for this disorder.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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Open Peer Review Period:

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