JMIR Dermatology

All topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care

Editor-in-Chief:

Robert Dellavalle MD, PhD, MSPH, Professor, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, and Chief of Dermatology - Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center


JMIR Dermatology (JDerm) is a sister journal of JMIR (the leading open-access journal in health informatics, Impact Factor 2020: 5.43), focusing on all topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care.  

As an open access journal, we are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, research letters and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

For a limited period of time, there are no fees to publish in this journal. Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged, ready for submission in PubMed Central. Although, please note, that JDerm is not currently included in PubMed Central (although this is expected in late 2022 or early 2023).

Become an author of this growing journal and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Epidemiology in Dermatology

The global burden of skin disease may be reduced through research efforts focused on skin diseases with the highest reported disability-adjusted life years.

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Reviews in Dermatology

Game-based approaches, or gamification, are popular learning strategies in medical education for health care providers and patients alike. Gamification has taken the form of serious educational games and simulations to enable learners to rehearse skills and knowledge in a safe environment. Dermatology learners in particular may benefit from gamification methods, given the visual and procedural nature of the field.

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Pressure Ulcers and Decubitus Wounds

Understanding hospital-acquired pressure injury (HAPrI) etiology is essential for developing effective preventive interventions. Pressure injuries are classified based on the degree of visible tissue damage; the two most commonly identified HAPrI stages in critical care patients are stage 2 and deep tissue injury (DTI). Some experts speculate that stage 2 and DTI have different etiologies, with stage 2 injuries formed from the “outside in” as a result of tissue deformation, decreased perfusion, and subsequent ischemia caused by external pressure and/or shear forces, whereas DTI emerges from the “inside out” due to inadequate perfusion to the deeper tissues causing tissue ischemia.

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Social Media in Dermatology

Without traditional in-person experiences due to COVID-19, dermatology residency applicants and programs had to search for new ways to get to know one another. Thus, many programs created or enhanced their social media accounts, specifically Instagram, providing an avenue for applicants. The Instagram Engagement Score (IES) is a tool that quantifies an Instagram account’s engagement.

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Skin Cancer and Melanoma Prevention

Melanoma is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia. Up to 75% of melanomas are first detected by patients or their family or friends. Many mobile apps for melanoma exist, including apps to encourage skin self-monitoring to improve the likelihood of early detection. Previous research in this area has focused on their development, diagnostic accuracy, or validation. Little is known about patients’ views and experiences of using these apps.

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Social Media in Dermatology

Psoriasis is a multisystem chronic inflammatory skin disease and is a relatively common disorder in children and adults. The burden of psoriasis impacts both the physiological and psychological areas of one’s life. Given the robust use of the internet and social media, patients have turned to Instagram for educational and social support to discuss psoriasis.

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Ethical and Legal Issues in Dermatology

Dermatology journals, periodicals, editorials, and news magazines are influential resources that are not uniformly regulated and subject to influence from the pharmaceutical industry. This study evaluates industry payments to physician editorial board members of common dermatology publications, including “throwaway” publications.

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Patient Education for Skin Conditions

Wikipedia is one of the most popular websites and may be a go-to source of health and dermatology education for the general population. Prior research indicates poor skin of color (SOC) photo representation in printed dermatology textbooks and online medical websites, but there has been no such assessment performed to determine whether this discrepancy also exists for Wikipedia.

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Psoriasis

Person-centered language places a person’s identity before any disability or medical condition they may have. Using person-centered language reduces stigma and improves the patient-physician relationship, potentially optimizing health outcomes. Patients with psoriasis often feel stigmatized due to their chronic skin condition.

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