JMIR Dermatology

All topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. JMIR Dermatology is the official journal of the International Society of Teledermatology.

Editor-in-Chief:

Robert Dellavalle MD, PhD, MSPH, Professor, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, and Chief of Dermatology - Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center


JMIR Dermatology (JDerm) is a Scopus, DOAJ, and CABI-indexed, peer-reviewed journal that focuses on all topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. While JDerm has strength in digital health and innovation in dermatology, it is also a general dermatology journal, and we welcome submissions from any part of the discipline.

As an open-access journal, we are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, research letters, and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews). Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged.

JMIR Dermatology is indexed in Scopus, DOAJ, and CABI, and recently passed Scientific Evaluation for PubMed Central/PubMed. Become an author of this growing journal and submit your paper today! For a limited time, there are no fees to publish in this journal.

Recent Articles

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Teledermatology

The field of teledermatology has expanded tremendously and has been used for conditions including hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). However, due to the sensitive location of lesions, HS may be considered less suitable for teledermatology.

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Cochrane Corner

This article summarizes an important Cochrane systematic review on the evidence of foam surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention.

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Skin Cancer and Melanoma Prevention

Long-term sun exposure is one of the risks faced by outdoor swimmers and can cause sunburn. Using sunscreen is one way to prevent sunburn; however, physical activity can trigger sweat, friction, and water washing that can interfere with sunscreen efficacy and decrease its sun protection factor (SPF). Sunscreens are classified into inorganic and organic based on their filter. Organic sunscreen has a better bond to the skin than inorganic sunscreen, which forms a barrier above the skin layer that makes removing it easier. Organic sunscreen lasts longer than inorganic sunscreen when used in physical activities, but it has a limited spectrum, is more photolabile, and is more allergenic.

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Teledermatology

The growing number of melanoma patients who need long-term surveillance increasingly exceeds the capacity of the dermatology workforce, particularly outside of metropolitan areas. Digital technologies that enable patients to perform skin self-examination and send dermoscopic images of lesions of concern to a dermatologist (mobile teledermoscopy) are a potential solution. If these technologies and the remote delivery of melanoma surveillance are to be incorporated into routine clinical practice, they need to be accepted by clinicians providing melanoma care, such as dermatologists and general practitioners (GPs).

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Machine Learning from Digital Images in Dermatology

Automatic skin lesion recognition has shown to be effective in increasing access to reliable dermatology evaluation; however, most existing algorithms rely solely on images. Many diagnostic rules, including the 3-point checklist, are not considered by artificial intelligence algorithms, which comprise human knowledge and reflect the diagnosis process of human experts.

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Case Report

Cutaneous reactions have been commonly associated with the Moderna messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccine. Among the reported cutaneous side effects, there have not been any associations reported yet regarding keratoacanthoma development after COVID-19 mRNA vaccination. We report a novel case of an 86-year-old man who experienced an eruption of multiple keratoacanthomas 2 weeks after inoculation with the Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine that resolved following treatment with intralesional 5-fluorouracil.

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Tattoos and Tattoo Removal

Tattoos are becoming increasingly common in the United States. However, little information is available to help clinicians anticipate where, when, and on what topics patients will seek guidance regarding tattoo care, complications, and removal.

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Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a potentially debilitating, chronic, recurring inflammatory disease. Observational databases provide opportunities to study the epidemiology of HS.

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Dermatology Health Services Research

Provider opt-out of accepting Medicare insurance is a nationally tracked metric by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for all physicians, including dermatologists. Although this usually only consists of a small number of providers, the magnitude of opting out has varied historically, often tracing changes in systemic health care policy.

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Teledermatology

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the widespread adoption of teledermatology, and this continues to account for a significant proportion of dermatology visits after clinics have reopened for in-person care. Delivery of high-quality teledermatology care requires adequate visualization of the patient’s skin, with photographs being preferred over live video for remote skin examination. It remains unknown which patients face the greatest barriers to participating in a teledermatology visit with photographs.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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