JMIR Dermatology

All topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. JMIR Dermatology is the official journal of the International Society of Teledermatology.

Editor-in-Chief:

Robert Dellavalle MD, PhD, MSPH, Professor, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, and Chief of Dermatology - Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center


JMIR Dermatology (JDerm) is a Scopus, DOAJ, and CABI indexed, peer-reviewed journal that focuses on all topics related to diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, with special emphasis on technologies for information exchange, education, and clinical care. While JDerm has strength in digital health and innovation in Dermatology, it is also a general dermatology journal and we welcome submissions from any part of the discipline.

As an open-access journal, we are read by clinicians and patients alike and have (as with all JMIR journals) a focus on readable and applied science reporting the design and evaluation of health innovations and emerging technologies. We publish original research, viewpoints, research letters and reviews (both literature reviews and medical device/technology/app reviews).

Articles are carefully copyedited and XML-tagged, ready for submission in PubMed Central. Please note, JDerm is not currently included in PubMed Central (although this is expected in late 2022 or early 2023).

For a limited time period, there are no fees to publish in this journal. Become an author of this growing journal and submit your paper today!

Recent Articles

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Epidemiology in Dermatology

Most common viral skin infections are not reportable conditions. Studying the population dynamics of these viral epidemics using traditional field methods is costly and time-consuming, especially over wide geographical areas.

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Case Report

Cutaneous angiomyolipoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor that is demographically, clinically, and immunohistochemically distinct from its renal and extrarenal counterparts. We present a case of cutaneous angiomyolipoma in the right retroauricular area of a 35-year-old male patient and provide a broad systematic review of the literature and the largest compilation of cutaneous angiomyolipomas reported to date. According to the findings presented in this review, we conclude that cutaneous angiomyolipoma should be completely separated from renal and extrarenal angiomyolipomas and therefore be considered a distinct entity in the classification of skin tumors.

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Case Report

Melanoma of the penis is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. We report the case of a 73-year-old patient with no significant medical history, admitted for deterioration of the general condition and bilateral inguinal lymph nodes. An abdominal ultrasound and thoraco-abdomino-pelvic CT (computed tomography) scan revealed metastatic liver nodules, the tumoral nature of which was confirmed by an anatomopathological examination. Further clinical examination revealed papular and ulcerated lesions of the penis located at the urethral meatus and glans penis. These lesions were biopsied and histologically assessed as melanoma. The contribution of imaging in penile tumors is generally not useful for diagnosis as clinical examination is key. However, it has its place in the assessment of locoregional and distant extension. In our case, it was the distant lesions that helped orient the diagnosis. The patient underwent immunotherapical treatment and is still alive 19 months after the diagnosis.

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Patient Education for Skin Conditions

A rapid expansion of systemic immunological treatment options for atopic dermatitis (AD) has created a need for clinically relevant and understandable comparative efficacy and safety information for patients and clinicians. Given the scarcity of head-to-head trials, network meta-analysis (NMA) is an alternative way to enable robust comparisons among treatment options; however, NMA results are often complex and difficult to directly implement in shared decision-making.

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Teledermatology

Challenges remain for general practitioners (GPs) in diagnosing (pre)malignant and benign skin lesions. Teledermoscopy (TDsc) supports GPs in diagnosing these skin lesions guided by teledermatologists' (TDs) diagnosis and advice and prevents unnecessary referrals to dermatology care. However, the impact of the availability of TDsc on GPs’ self-reported referral decisions to dermatology care before and after the TDsc consultation is unknown.

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Publication Behavior, Journalogy, Scientometrics and Research Issues in Dermatology

Predatory publishing is a deceptive form of publishing that uses unethical business practices, minimal to no peer review processes, or limited editorial oversight to publish articles. It may be problematic to our highest standard of scientific evidence—systematic reviews—through the inclusion of poor-quality and unusable data, which could mislead results, challenge outcomes, and undermine confidence. Thus, there is a growing concern surrounding the effects predatory publishing may have on scientific research and clinical decision-making.

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Skin Cancer and Melanoma Prevention

A new and potentially dangerous health trend, testicle tanning, received extensive media attention following a popular television program where a health and fitness influencer touted that testicular tanning increases testosterone levels. It has been shown that the public has a particular interest in tanning wellness trends; thus, given the vague nomenclature of the practice, the abundance of misleading information and support for using UV light by other health influencers may lead to an increase in men exposing themselves to UV radiation and developing associated complications.

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E-Dermatology - General Articles

Clinical trials have led to the development of new and effective therapies for many dermatologic conditions. To our knowledge, there is no published study that has quantified and described the degree of involvement in clinical trials among academic dermatologists and their university affiliates.

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Research Letter

The Altmetric score (AS) is a novel measure of publication impact that is calculated by the number of mentions across various social media websites. This method may have advantages over traditional bibliometrics in the context of research by medical students.

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Image Recognition and AI in Dermatology

Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are a type of artificial intelligence that shows promise as a diagnostic aid for skin cancer. However, the majority are trained using retrospective image data sets with varying image capture standardization.

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